Spirit of Dragonflies

Guide to Awakening Your Inner Self – Begin Your Creative Journey Today


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WPC – Evanescent

This challenge is wide open. Evanescent can be any fleeting moment in time. It could be the moment you drop a seed into your garden, marking that promise of new growth to come. It could be a photo of the Eastern Phoebe that visits your deck each day, wagging her tail as she calls her own name. If you’re in the Southern Hemisphere, it could be that carpet of leaves that fell overnight, before the wind scatters them. It might be the moment you light the first fire of Fall.

“Human life is as evanescent as the morning dew or a flash of lightning.” ~ Samuel Butler ~

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Just as the morning dew vanishes with the sunshine of the day, children grow and move on into adulthood in what seems a blink of an eye. The time passing is caught in little glimpses of memory.

We don’t really realize how evanescent youth really is until we are older. Thankfully our memories hold reflections of the past, never remembering an entire scene or event, just a little glimpse of what once was.

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When I see this photo of the reflection of my son and grandson in the window, I see the evanescent of youth as I wonder when did my own little boy become this man. Wasn’t it just yesterday that he was that little window shopping with me. My grandson lives on the other side of the country so we only seeing each other one or two times a year. I am always amazed at how tall he has grown between visits and all the new ideas, words, and skills he has mastered since our last visit.

This is why living in the moment and being mindful of the people in your life is so important. When together turn off electronics, engage in conversation, activities, fun and play. Build strong memories to bring you peace and joy later in life, and the knowing that you took the time to enjoy every precious moment.

Love and Light!

If you would like to view additional photos or submit your own to this week’s challenge, click on the link below:

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/evanescent/


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WPC – Nostalgia

“I’m terribly nostalgic, but I’m with the Elizabethans who thought nostalgia was a disease. It’s a dangerous place to be because you can get caught up in it.” ~ Mark Gatiss ~

I think Mark Gatiss is correct. Being nostalgic is fine to visit however you don’t want to get stuck there.

Every time I visit my brother-in-law’s hunting camp a sense of sadness fills my heart. At the same time I feel filled with love and happiness from the wonderful memories shared at camp. The women would vacation at the camp in the summer. When fall arrived only the men were allowed. Over the last several decades the older family members have died and my brother-in-law, sister and their daughters have relocated to Florida and Kansas. Now, I just go and sit outside or walk to the pond to enjoy the view.

 

When I was a child they didn’t have a bathroom or toilet inside the camp. The earlier outhouse had two holes so I would go inside with my sister or mother. It was very dark at night in the Adirondack Mountains and before they installed electric we used oil lamps and  flashlights. My brother-in-law’s brother and my sister had hours of fun building Tee-Pees and running through the woods playing freely in nature.

 

Out behind the camp was a path to the pond. The red shed is still standing along the path. Once a well-worn path, now it is covered in grass due to the lack of use. The view of the pond is still as beautiful as ever especially in the early fall – before hunting season begins.

In the early days they pulled water from the pump. Now it is more decoration than anything however if it is primed water will still flow. We get our drinking water from the fresh water pipe down the mountain from camp. Non-potable water is now pumped into the camp from the creek for washing dishes.

Before I leave it is always a special treat to see the creek and remember the uncles fishing. They would wear long sleeve shirts, even in the heat of summer, hats with netting, long pants and boots. We may not see them for the entire day. We were always allowed to share in the fun, even though I didn’t eat the fish. Sitting by the creek I felt their presence. The photo to the left is from the left side of the road and the one on the right is behind the camp. Sitting near the camp, listening to the flowing water takes me back in time. I can’t linger too long because the memory can bring sadness knowing that they are all deceased – Mom, Dad, Johnny, Adam, Winnie, Betty, Mike and many more. The best thing about camp is all the memories we shared there in my youth and then while I was mother to my own children. They are wonderful memories and one of the reasons why I find being in nature is so soothing.

“We could never have loved the earth so well if we had had no childhood in it.” ~George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss, 1860 ~

When my older two children were young, they loved to run outside in the woods, fish in the creek, swim in the swimming hole across the street and build Tee-Pees out of sticks as we had when children. My older daughter took her first steps at camp. My son celebrated his 13th birthday and my nieces gifted him with naked playing cards. Poor Joe was outnumbered by all of my nieces and they enjoyed embarrassing him.

My youngest daughter spent hours in the woods pretending the area in the photo below was her home. She set up a stove, chair, and used small twigs and leaves in the pan for food to share with any willing adults who visited her.

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“Nostalgia for what we have lost is more bearable than nostalgia for what we have never had, for the first involves knowledge and pleasure, the second only ignorance and pain.” ~Mignon McLaughlin, The Neurotic’s Notebook, 1960 ~

I am grateful for the wonderful memories of pleasurable times with family and friends. Even though no longer part of my life, it is such a great feeling knowing that my own children were able to share some of the same memories from my own childhood. It would be great to have similar memories to share with my grandchildren. They may not share in the camp memories however we are sharing nature in different ways and building our own memories.

If you would like to view other photos or would like to submit your own, click on the link below:

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/nostalgia/

Love and Light!


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In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “From Every Angle.”

The Stillwater Block House was located in the Saratoga National Historical Park during my youth. Somewhere along the way the National Historical Park decided the Block House was not original to the Revolutionary War and had it removed. The Historical Society worked long and hard to gather enough money to move the Block House to its current location along the banks of the Hudson River. What a perfect location to have this historical building and a nice park with beautiful views of the Hudson River and trees across the river. In Autumn, with the red, oranges and gold it is truly breathtaking and in the winter covered in white it is as well. I have posted winter photos of this location in the past.

Today, after taking photos of the Railroad Bridge spanning the Hudson on the south end of the town of Stillwater I drove to the Block House Park to take another shot of the bridge from another location. While standing in the park decided to add two posts to this week’s photo challenge. Walking around the Block House I was able to really take the time to notice the building, how the light hit each section, the structure, lines, and detail of the building. As you will notice from the photos there is a canon placed in front of the building. It is very well maintained.

A tree was planted in this park in memory of my cousin who was killed in one of the Twin Tower in New York City on 9/11/2001 which adds to this special location. The Hudson River is very still in this area, thus the name Stillwater. The park is a peaceful place to sit and write, contemplate or just enjoy the scenery.

If you are interested in learning more about Stillwater and this historic site please visit this website. http://www.stillwaterny.org/history/towns-historical-markers/the-stillwater-blockhouse-and-museum/

If you would like to learn more about the Saratoga National Historical Park visit this site. http://www.nps.gov/sara/index.htm

Although I no longer live in Stillwater many of my family members still live in family homes. This was my mother’s birth place where she lived with her parents and 12 siblings. It is a small village where most of the people know one another and can share in the history of the village and families that have lived there.

Do you (or did you) live in an area where your own family has a history?

Love and Light!